Godspeed You! Black Emperor and Monumental review – an almighty revelation par Kate Hennesy

Publié le 18 mars 2016 par Sandrine Lambert

Découvrez un article du Guardian à propos de Monumental avec Godspeed You! Black Emperor à l’occasion de leur prestation australienne! Vivement le 15 avril à Québec qu’on assiste à ça nous aussi.

The Holy Body Tattoo perform Monumental with live musical accompaniment from post-rockers Godspeed You! Black Emperor at Adelaide festival. Photograph: Tony Lewis/Prue Bassett Publicity

The Holy Body Tattoo perform Monumental with live musical accompaniment from post-rockers Godspeed You! Black Emperor at Adelaide festival.
Photograph: Tony Lewis/Prue Bassett Publicity

Post-rock is a loudly ponderous, insistently serious kind of music: all brooding soundscapes, apocalyptic themes and long, instrumental songs that are fanned into vast fire-fronts of noise. Everything emotes.

Formed in Montreal in 1994, Godspeed You! Black Emperor takes post-rock’s tropes to the hilt. They answer interview questions as a collective, play in the dark and have song names such as Piss Crowns Are Trebled and We Drift Like Worried Fire. So why, then, did I so thoroughly enjoy not one, but two Adelaide festival events featuring them?

The first was a dance piece called Monumental by fellow Canadians, Holy Body Tattoo. When it was originally performed in 2005, Godspeed was on hiatus so the piece was scored with the band’s recorded music. When Godspeed reformed in 2010, Adelaide festival director David Sefton saw his chance to have some chats and align some stars. Thus, Monumental was resurrected – this time with Godspeed live onstage.

Choreographers Dana Gingras and Noam Gagnon are known for pushing dancers to their limits. Only then are the body’s secrets truly illuminated, they say. Still, you think, this is contemporary dance. The abstract and the ambiguous is a given.

Not at Monumental. Its language is direct and confronting. For most of the show the dancers stand on individual pedestals, sometimes gesturing like Communist dictators but more often than not, suffering. They twitch, scratch, pant and cower, knead their aching shoulders and tear at their hair. Even poses suggestive of yoga, tai chi and prayer are repeated joylessly; it is an exhausting drill.

An A to Z of disorders is insinuated: anxiety, anger management, obsessive compulsive disorder, paranoia, Tourette’s syndrome and Trichotillomania (where people pull out their hair). The duets speak of intimacy troubles and betrayal. Lord of the Flies springs to mind during the ensemble pieces. The dancers jerk, lurch, run in mindless circles and trip each other over; marionettes to a spiteful puppeteer.

It sounds unpleasant but it is electrifying instead.

Pour lire la suite de l’article, cliquez ici.

Source: The GuardianKate Hennesy.

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